Radiosendung „High Scores“ (englisch) zur Historie von Musik in Videogames


  • emulaThor
  • 168 Views 1reply

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site, you are agreeing to our Cookie Policy.

  • Radiosendung „High Scores“ (englisch) zur Historie von Musik in Videogames

    Hallo,

    Ich wollte Euch darauf hinweisen, dass es ab morgen eine mehrteilige Radioserie gibt auf dem britischen Radiosender BBC6 Music.



    High Scores: A History of Video Games Music

    Moderiert von Mark Savage


    Die Sendung läuft immer sonntags und ist eine Stunde lang. Die Sendung beginnt um 14 Uhr deutscher Zeit. Man kann den Sender in Deutschland als Internetstream hören über Internetradio oder die BBC iPlayer Website - oh: für Radio heißt das wohl jetzt BBC Sounds.


    bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0002y9q/episodes/guide

    bbc.co.uk/mediacentre/proginfo…story-of-video-game-music


    Daneben gibt es heute Nacht um 2 Uhr deutscher Zeit noch folgende Sendung auf der gleichen Station:

    Charlie Brooker's Video Game Playlist

    High Scores
    Charlie Brooker discusses his passion for video games, and selects some of his favourite game music.

    bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0002y9p

    EDIT:

    Heute lief diese Radiosendung auf BBC Radio 3 und kann online nachgehört werden:


    Video Game Music: Lines, Loops and Layers

    Sound of Cinema
    Matthew Sweet looks at how you set about composing music for a video game and visits composer Stephen Baysted to discover some of the unique techniques the medium demands.
    bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0002zkp


    Bei BBC Sounds kann man die Radiosendungen für 30 Tage nach Ausstrahlung im Browser anhören:

    • Episode 1 von "High Scores" kann man sich hier anhören.
    • "Charlie Brooker's Video Game Playlist" kann man sich hier anhören. Das ist ein Gespräch mit Mark Savage, dass auch in Episode 1 von "High Scores" in Auszügen verwendet wird.
    • Die Sendung "Video Game Music: Lines, Loops and Layers" kann man sich hier anhören.


    Viele Grüße
    Emulathor



    <EDIT MOD> Postings zusammengeführt

    The post was edited 2 times, last by syshack: Ergänzungen ().

  • Am Sonntag ist die zweite Episode von "High Scores" gelaufen (mehr Episoden gibt es nicht). Man kann sie sich 30 Tage nach Ausstrahlung noch an hören bei BBC Sounds:
    bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/m00034zw

    Im Titel der Sendung ist übrigens ein musikalisches Wortspiel versteckt (ich nehme es jedenfalls an): Scores sind einmal die Punkte am Spielende, aber auch die Noten, die ein Musikstück beschreiben.

    Der Appetitmacher-Text für die zweite Episode lautet:

    BBC Sounds wrote:

    Could you write music for a film if no-one had shown you the script? That’s the problem games composers face every day. They’re scoring scenes where the player has free will, and the music only works if it reflects their choices. So how do you do it?


    Mark Savage takes a deep dive into game music, with composers The Flight (Assassin’s Creed: Odyssey, Horizon: Zero Dawn) and Winifred Phillips (God Of War, Little Big Planet) stripping down their soundtracks to reveal how they work.


    Radio 3’s Tom Service drops in to explain how game music is full of psychological cues; while Ludomusicologist Tim Summers explains the importance of “death music”.


    Wrapping up the series, art-rock band 65 Days of Static demonstrate how they created an “infinite soundtrack” for the sci-fi game No Man’s Sky, which changes every time it’s played.

    Der Vollständigkeit halber hier auch noch der Appetitanreger für die Episode Eins:


    BBC Sounds wrote:

    Video game music has come a long way since the bleeps and bloops of Pong. Games like Assassin’s Creed and Red Dead Redemption 2 now come with dense, cinematic scores that stretch over 50 or 60 hours of playing time.


    Mark Savage speaks to some of the industry's leading composers, including Yoko Shimomura (Street Fighter II), Grant Kirkhope (Goldeneye) and Bafta-winner Jessica Curry (Everybody’s Gone To The Rapture) and finds out how games companies threw a lifeline to Europe’s orchestras when they started commissioning new works.


    He’ll also find out how Michael Jackson and David Bowie ended up as video game characters; and why bands like Depeche Mode and Katy Perry have re-recorded their hits in gibberish for the hit game The Sims.


    Recorded in Japan, the US and UK, the programme also features observations from gaming expert Charlie Brooker, who chooses his favourite video game music in a separate 6 Music show on 3 March.

    Viel Spaß!